Brigadoon Remote, Democracy, Barkley Marathons, Billions

Brigadoon Weekly March 2019.png

Brigadoon Remote, Democracy, Barkley Marathons, Billions

Brigadoon Weekly
April 28, 2019
Curation and commentary from 
Marc A. Ross

Reporting from Alexandria, Virginia 

Brigadoon Weekly  = Global Emerging Issues


ROSS RANT


21 ways to not have the right network

1. Same backgrounds - think homophily.

2. Lack of mission statement.

3. Thinking small.

4. Too much self-reliance.

5. Same skills. Same talents. Same ideas.

6. Too provincial.

7. Limited perspective.

8. Choosing personality over purpose.

9. Reactive. 

10. Not stubborn enough.

11. Easily swayed.

12. Over-reliance on cash and class as the connection.

13. Spending not investing.

14. No reboot.

15. Too many jerks.

16. More campaign, not cause.

17. Comfortable and content.

18. Thinking the hype is real.

19. Lack of moxie.

20. Don’t do the work.

21. Many ideas, no execution.

Brigadoon Remote 2019 | Scotland

One of my most exciting ideas to date, Brigadoon Remote.

Think of four days where you can work remotely in the countryside, spend the day as you want, work on your book, strategize, think, read, whiteboard, check-out, go for a hike, and have evening dinners with fellow participants where the topic of conversation is business development and entrepreneurship.

I have secured a country estate one hour outside of Edinburgh, Scotland for a multi-day remote working experience limited to 7 participants.

If you are keen, a $250.00 deposit secures your spot. 

Ping me at marc@thebrigadoon.com if you want to attend.

-Marc

Marc A. Ross is the founder of Brigadoon and specializes in communications for thought leaders working at the intersection of globalization, disruption, and politics.

FIVE TO READ

One: 3 trends driving corporate image: The Axios Harris Poll 100 ranks the reputations of the most visible U.S. companies, based on a nationally representative sample of 18,228 Americans, and the rankings are billed as "a measurement of what real people think right now about the companies in our cultural conversation." The big picture: From the world's most influential tech companies to the places where Americans shop to eat everyday, there are three big trends that Harris uncovered in this year's poll.

1. De-FAANGed by the techlash
2. Captains of controversy
3. The wellness revolution


Two: When democracy is no longer the only path to prosperity: Countries rated ‘not free’ are increasingly able to offer their citizens high incomes. Will democratic ideals lose their appeal?

Three: The great lost dead archive: As a longtime sound engineer for the Grateful Dead, Dan Healy pioneered the way live music hits you in the gut—and he amassed a rich collection of tour tees along the way. Then he forgot about it. GQ visited Healy at his home in Marin, for a look at his newly re-discovered archive—and to hear the untold stories of his years on the road.

Four: New carmaker on the block: Byton’s CEO on China’s car of the future: Carsten Breitfeld, an industry veteran turned disruptor, explains how his Chinese-conceived, globally oriented start-up is tuned for the emerging mobility transformation.

Five: 60 hours of hell: The story of the Barkley Marathons: Inspired by an infamous assassin’s escape from prison, the Barkley Marathons just might be the toughest race on the planet: a 100-mile-long, unsupported slog through the Tennessee backcountry that only 14 people have ever finished. Madison Kahn spoke to three of the event’s regulars to get the story behind the Barkley.

BRIGADOON RADIO

Brigadoon Radio: Episode 11: Why Brigadoon works: Recorded Pinehaven House at Sundance Mountain Resort, Brendan Kownacki speaks with Marc A. Ross during Brigadoon Sundance 2019.

Marc is the founder of Brigadoon and has curated seven multi-day gatherings at Sundance, Utah starting in 2013. Marc explains the magic of connecting subject matter experts at a venue tucked in a magical canyon in the Utah mountains.

Marc specializes in communications for thought leaders working at the intersection of globalization, disruption, and politics.

Brigadoon Radio: Episode 12: Brigadoon as an idea generator: Recorded at the lounge inside the Robert Redford Center at Sundance Mountain Resort, Dr. Mark Stellingworth speaks with Mike St. Clair during Brigadoon Sundance 2019.

Mike is a 4x Brigadoon Sundance participant and talks about how the conversations at the gathering stimulate ideas and habits which have helped him grow professionally and personally.

Michael is the owner of Capital Edge based in Des Moines, Iowa. Mike specializes in government relations for large national corporations, small Iowa businesses, as well as trade associations serving national and local constituencies.

BRIGADOON EVENTS


SAVE THE DATES:

Brigadoon Annapolis 2019 | Salon Dinner + Sailing
September 12-13

Brigadoon Los Angeles 2019 | Salon Dinner
September 26

Brigadoon Detroit 2019 | Salon Dinner + Tour
October 3-4

Brigadoon Cincinnati 2019 | Salon Dinner
October 24

Brigadoon Remote 2019 | Scotland
November 11-15

Brigadoon Sundance 2020 | Utah
February 23-25

More information click - here.

PODCAST

a16z podcast: For the billions of creatives out there: This special, almost-crossover episode of the a16z Podcast features Billions co-showrunner Brian Koppelman — who also co-wrote movies such as Rounders and Ocean’s 13 with his longtime creative partner David Levien — in conversation with Marc Andreessen (and Sonal Chokshi). The discussion covers everything from managing up — when it comes to executives or investors sharing their “notes” aka “feedback” on your work — to managing down, with one’s team; to managing one’s partners (or co-founders)… and especially managing yourself. How to tame those irrational emotions, that ego?


#BAET = Be An Entrepreneur Today

-Marc 

Red Bull, Physicists, Belt and Road Initiative, Growth Marketing

Brigadoon Weekly March 2019.png

Red Bull, Physicists, Belt and Road Initiative, Growth Marketing

Brigadoon Weekly
April 21, 2019
Curation and commentary from 
Marc A. Ross

Reporting from Alexandria, Virginia 

Brigadoon Weekly  = Emerging issues shaping commerce + culture


ROSS RANT

Red Bull wasn't created by economists

"Marketing is the science of knowing what economists are wrong about."  -- Rory Sutherland

As a means to beat Coca-Cola, no economist would approve of an expensive beverage, served in a small can, and which tastes awful.

An economist using logic, facts, and numbers would never greenlight Red Bull.

But Red Bull has changed the global beverage market forever and altered the way Coca-Cola operates permanently.

Austria beating Atlanta is the playbook of how products and ideas will win going forward.

Energy drinks have transitioned from being a niche product to one of the fastest growing segments in the global drinks market. The global energy drinks market now stands at $55 billion and is projected to grow at a compound annual growth rate of 3.7% from 2018 through 2023.

How troubling is this for Coke? 

Consider the first energy drink under the Coca-Cola brand will launch in Europe this month.

Coca-Cola Energy, which will debut in Spain and Hungary, features caffeine from naturally-derived sources, guarana extracts, B vitamins, and no taurine – sounds like Red Bull but with a Coca-Cola taste. 

And not surprisingly, Coca-Cola Energy will be offered in 250-ml cans, just like Red Bull.

The economists of Atlanta are following the entrepreneurship of Austria.

Economists assume most decision making is driven by logic. 

This is flawed.

Using logic to make a decision is called System 2 thinking. 

But most decision making is driven by emotion. 

This is called System 1 thinking.

Facts and numbers don’t drive our decision making. 

Facts take a back seat to emotional responses. 

Numbers with no context and color are no match for actual experiences. 

Great marketers understand the power of ubiquitous and unconscious System 1 decision making to sell products or shape ideas.

Sutherland believes, "Once you reach a basic level of wealth in society, most problems are actually problems of perception.”

The role of a business is to create value by solving problems for customers.

As I move through life, it is clear you don’t always need to solve difficult technical challenges with massive and costly technical solutions.

You need to communicate with a customer to see things from a different, more indirect point of view.

Acknowledging the importance of perception well better position your brand and improve communications.

When it comes to entrepreneurship and thought leadership, one is bigger than two.

-Marc

Marc A. Ross is the founder of Brigadoon and specializes in thought leader strategy for executives and entrepreneurs working at the intersection of globalization, disruption, and politics.

FIVE TO READ

One: A quantum experiment suggests there’s no such thing as objective reality: Physicists have long suspected that quantum mechanics allows two observers to experience different, conflicting realities. Now they’ve performed the first experiment that proves it.

Two: Misdiagnosing the Chinese infrastructure push: China’s Belt and Road Initiative does not pose a military or strategic threat to the West so much as an economic one.

Three: How humans and artificial intelligence can work together to create a brighter future

Four: The casualization of American apparel: Will the athleisure trend stay or go?

Five: How to identify and tell your most powerful stories: When I ask executives what their favorite speech is, Steve Jobs’s Stanford commencement address is always at the top of the list. Many think of Jobs’s talk as their favorite because it is incredibly moving — thanks to the stories it contains. Execs love to hear talks like this, but few are comfortable delivering them. Why? Because great stories expose our flaws and our struggles. This is what makes them inspiring, and not sharing them is such a missed opportunity to connect with your audience.

BRIGADOON RADIO

Brigadoon Radio: Episode 9: Accessing Fresh Perspectives: Recorded Pinehaven House at Sundance Mountain Resort, Dr. Mark Stellingworth speaks with Leo D'Cruz during Brigadoon Sundance 2019.

Leo is a 2x Brigadoon Sundance participant and is a communications strategist serving as Chief Communications Officer @ ReverbArt + Design based in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Brigadoon Radio: Episode 10: What Makes a Good Founder: Recorded at the lounge inside the Robert Redford Center at Sundance Mountain Resort, Dr. Mark Stellingworth speaks with Michael Rivera during Brigadoon Sundance 2019.

Michael is a first time Brigadoon Sundance participant and for 2019 joined the main stage to lead a discussion on "Life Is a Startup: What Founders Can Teach Us About Making Choices + Managing Change."

Michael is the Executive Director of Founder Central @ USC Marshall School of Business. Michael joined Founder Central after eleven years as the Founder & Managing Director of an early-stage investment firm based in Santa Monica. 

PODCAST

This Week in Startups + Rachel Hepworth: She's the head of growth marketing at Slack. On the podcast, she breaks down how startups should “Go to Market and Grow” @ Founder University. You can listen - here.


#BAET = Be An Entrepreneur Today

-Marc 

Counting, Blonde Salad, Premier Lacrosse League, Digital Metrics

Brigadoon Weekly March 2019.png

Counting, Blonde Salad, Premier Lacrosse League, Digital Metrics

Brigadoon Weekly
April 14, 2019
Curation and commentary from 
Marc A. Ross

Reporting from Alexandria, Virginia 

Brigadoon Weekly  = Global Emerging Issues


Marc, what are you working on this week? How can Brigadoon help?

ROSS RANT


Being counted doesn't always count.

"Not everything that counts can be counted, and not everything that can be counted counts." -- Albert Einstein

The world is inundated with data.

But yet Hollywood can't guarantee a hit.

The outcome of the Stanley Cup can't be confirmed.

The future UK PM officeholder can't be verified.

And the next chef to beat Bobby Flay can't be affirmed.

Still, we love data.

"Do a survey. Do a focus group. Do a study."

Do more data.

I don't think the magic is in more data.

Data should not be about trying to use the information to prove a theory, but to see what the numbers are actually telling us and to inform us what we might be missing - especially since the mind likes to trick us.

You see, our brains are wired to remember and overvalue the vivid and the shocking. Our brains are wired to remember events that actually happened and not events that could happen.

So often we comfort ourselves in data to gain a better understanding and some guidance, but the data often falls short.

In their book, Why Everything You Know About Soccer is Wrong, authors Chris Anderson and David Sally concluded that soccer is basically a 50/50 game. Half is luck, and half is skill.

With this conclusion, the authors determined there are two routes to soccer glory. One is being good. The other is being lucky. You need both to win a championship. But you only need one to win a game.

Disney CEO Bob Iger used a similar conclusion this week.

With the announcement of his company's over the top Disney+ streaming service, Iger is going where his customers are going. One where customers can customize their viewing experience and seamlessly view Mickey and Minnie on numerous devices.

No survey, no focus group, and no study needed to know this is a good move for Disney.

Disney has a customer experience that is visceral and multigenerational. A customer experience that is deep and broad. A customer experience forged with skill.

But Iger knows Disney needs more than skill to win the future.

As Iger told CNBC, if you measure the future against the present, the present doesn't stay the present for very long. Today's marketplace has never been more dynamic.

You can't measure what is happening today. You need to measure what you think will happen in the future - that and harness a little luck.

The reasons many of us don't innovate is the data and the information being used is shaped by a current business model and what has gotten us to our current status.

Data which is based on the present and data which is not of the future.

So be mindful of having too much data as a means to confirm what you want the outcome to be.

Plus don't be afraid of harnessing a little bit of luck.

- Marc

Marc A. Ross is the founder of Brigadoon and specializes in thought leader strategy and idea amplification for senior executives working at the intersection of globalization, disruption, and politics.

FIVE TO READ

One: Chiara Ferragni — the Italian influencer who built a global brand: She launched her Blonde Salad blog 10 years ago as a bit of fun. Now she manages a €30m business and is one of the most influential people in fashion. 

Two: Human contact is now a luxury good: Screens used to be for the elite. Now avoiding them is a status symbol.

Three: Andrew Marshall, Pentagon strategist, 1921-2019: A prescient threat analyst who helped reboot US intelligence. 

In a building notorious for groupthink, Marshall’s perspective stood out. He foresaw the demise of the Soviet Union long before most others. Before the cold war was over, he switched his focus to the rise of China. He had a rare knack for separating noise from signal. “Who else would have asked about China the day after 9/11?” recalls Andrew May, one of Marshall’s protégés.

Four: How lacrosse star Paul Rabil aims to redefine professional sports: With the new Premier Lacrosse League, he and his brother Mike are inventing a new business model—and challenging some pro sports sacred cows.

Five: Digital metrics blocking business value creation: “A lot of businesses talk about CPA (cost per customer acquisition) metrics but the problem fundamentally with measurement is that markets haven’t been able to measure anything for a long period of time and suddenly they can measure. The stuff they think they can measure is not necessarily the right things to invest in.” 

BRIGADOON RADIO

Brigadoon Radio: Episode 7: The Future of Work: Recorded at the lounge inside the Robert Redford Center at Sundance Mountain Resort, Dr. Mark Stellingworth speaks with Deloris Wilson during Brigadoon Sundance 2019.

Deloris is a first time Brigadoon Sundance participant and for 2019 joined the main stage to lead a discussion on "Mind the Gap: What’s Missing in the Future of Work."

Deloris is an entrepreneur, social impact strategist, and equity advocate fueled by an earnest designer to equalize opportunity. As a strategist, she has crafted programs and initiatives to drive civil sector capacity in Sint Maarten, expand access to legal rights in Ghana, build new majority-owned businesses across the United States, and develop the cultural industries of Barbados.

Brigadoon Radio: Episode 8: 365 Days of Optimism: Recorded Pinehaven House at Sundance Mountain Resort, Brendan Kownacki speaks with Wendy Jones during Brigadoon Sundance 2019.

Wendy is a first time Brigadoon Sundance participant and led a whiteboard session on the power and benefits of optimism.

Wendy is an author and founder of The Optimists Journal, a generational learning platform to help people and families heal and learn about each other.

PODCAST

The Bob Lefsetz Podcast: Lefsetz speaks with the punk rock rebel, college radio star, singer-songwriter, and left-wing political activist Billy Bragg. On the podcast Bragg tells the story of growing up poor and rejecting his preordained future at Ford's to become a part of the political fabric of the UK, all via music. Billy tells a great story, you'll become a fan even if you're unfamiliar with his music (and learn a lot about Brexit too!)

Introvert, Fail, Legendary, Cool, Curiosity

Brigadoon Weekly March 2019.png

Introvert, Fail, Legendary, Cool, Curiosity

Brigadoon Weekly
March 31, 2019
Curation and commentary from 
Marc A. Ross

Reporting from Alexandria, Virginia 

Brigadoon Weekly  = Global Emerging Issues


ROSS RANT


Thought leadership: Introverts wanted

Here's the big idea = Going forward, thought leadership and idea amplification is the process to shape globalization, disruption, and politics.

From my experience, most people over-index on tactics and vanity metrics and fail on strategy and organization.

From my experience, not engaging, not sharing, and not playing doesn't make the difference.

If you want to start a business, win a campaign, or change a culture, you can't do it from the sidelines.

Like the lottery, you got to be in it to win it.

Just this week, rising Democrat star and potential national candidate Stacey Abrams on The View told the audience, "I am an introvert. I don't like public stuff."

Imagine that.

An introvert.

A leader who has served as Minority Leader of the Georgia House of Representatives, was her party's nominee in the 2018 Georgia gubernatorial election, and in February 2019, became the first African-American woman to deliver a response to the State of the Union address.

Imagine that.

An introvert.

Abrams went on to tell the audience she is self-aware, recognizes the fear, and take steps to "hack opportunity."

She closed powerfully by saying, "In politics, they will never elect you if they never hear from you. You can't secretly run for president, or governor, or school board."

A good reminder from even one of the most talented politicians amongst us.

You got to be in it to win it.

- Marc

Marc A. Ross is the founder of Brigadoon and specializes in thought leader strategy and idea amplification for executives and entrepreneurs working at the intersection of globalization, disruption, and politics.


FIVE TO READ

10 reasons why you fail http://bit.ly/2JM2Clp

Can Amazon reinvent the traditional supermarket? Amazon’s plans to launch physical grocery stores this year is just the latest affirmation that, ironically, bricks-and-mortar stores are crucial to the e-commerce giant’s future growth. Amazon may launch as many as 2,000 supermarkets in major U.S. cities, according to a recent report in The Wall Street Journal. It will be Amazon’s sixth physical retail format after Whole Foods, Amazon Books, Amazon Go, Amazon 4-Star and Amazon Pop-Up. https://whr.tn/2JNJPpU

Whatever retail store format Amazon uses, it “would be built upon this tremendous capacity they have to gather, analyze, understand and use what customers are saying to them every day,” said Mark Cohen, director of retail studies at Columbia University who had been CEO of Sears Canada. “Amazon is proof-positive of the value of big data and the way in which you collect it and the way in which you examine it and use it.”

30 legendary startup pitch decks and what you can learn from them http://bit.ly/2SMNA2C

Squaring up: How Insta-fashion is changing the way we shop: Instagram has become the window display for a new generation of savvy shoppers – and it’s changing the way we consume style, for good and bad. Leah Harper of The Guardian meets some of the pioneers at the forefront of Insta-fashion. http://bit.ly/2JQPpHX

Adam Grant: Why behavioral economics is cool, and I’m not.The boundaries between economics and psychology. http://bit.ly/2JU56hH 

BRIGADOON RADIO

Brigadoon Radio: Episode 5: The power of curiosity: Recorded at the Screening Room at Sundance Film Institute, Dr. Mark Stellingworth speaks with Catie Hargrove at Brigadoon Sundance 2019.

Catie is a 4x Brigadoon Sundance participant and for 2019 lead a whiteboard session on what she has learned in her nearly 20 years of management consulting and the need for more leaders to embrace curiosity as the tool to greatness. 

Catie is an executive coach, speaker, and author and you can find her on LinkedIn.

Brigadoon Radio: Episode 6: John Wick Republican: Recorded Pinehaven House at Sundance Mountain Resort, Dr. Mark Stellingworth speaks with Chad Munitz during Brigadoon Sundance 2019.

Chad is a 5x Brigadoon Sundance participant and has served as a Brigadoon Ambassador and co-host for Brigadoon Cincinnati 2019. Chad and Mark discussed the vision of Brigadoon, building a vinyl album collection, and comic books as art.

Chad is Vice President of Development at Towne Properties and you can find him on LinkedIn.

You can listen to both broadcasts - here.