Buzz + Ideas

Commentary + Concepts

Did you know?

Mini satellites: This fall, a few American satellites, each no bigger than a brick, will enter the atmosphere of Mars, 33.9 million miles away — demonstrating a powerful new technology that will undoubtedly shape our futures. These miniature satellites, called CubeSats, were designed to follow NASA’s Mars robotic lander, InSight, as it attempts to land on the red planet in November, and they will relay information back to Earth. The goal is to demonstrate how low-cost CubeSat technology can be used in deep space and travel farther than any miniature satellite before.

A traditional communications satellite can be as big as a school bus and weigh 6 tons. Today’s microsatellites can weigh between 22 and 220 pounds, with some nanosatellites weighing under 22 pounds. 

The US plans to sequence 1 million genomes: Three DNA sequencing centers have been chosen for the project in Texas, Massachusetts, and Washington.

Recyclable packaging: Environmental campaigners in the UK have been mailing their Walkers potato chip bags back to the PepsiCo-owned manufacturer, in protest of what they see as an overly-slow plan for phasing out non-recyclable packaging. 

37: Sub-Saharan Africa will account for 37 percent of the world’s births by 2050, according to UN forecasts.

Too much screen time, too little horseplay for kids: study: AFP reports, only one in 20 kids in the United States meets guidelines on sleep, exercise and screen time, and nearly a third are outside recommendations for all three, according to a study published Thursday. 

On average, children aged eight to 11 spent 3.6 hours per day glued to a TV, mobile phone, tablet or computer screen, nearly double the suggested limit of two hours, researchers found.

CNET: Impostor Syndrome leaves most tech workers feeling like a fake https://cnet.co/2NHAa5M

A new informal study shows that 58 percent of tech employees from companies like Facebook, Amazon, Apple, and Microsoft feel like frauds.

Products.png



Did you know?

How meditation can make you more creative http://bit.ly/2N4G5g5

I prefer loud EDM to spur creativity or a good walk or skiing down a steep hill.

The internet will be split in two by 2028, former Google CEO predicts: China and the US could lead two different versions of the internet in future.

Intranet = China
Internet = USA

Lax: The Sports & Fitness Industry Association identifies 2.17 million lacrosse participants in the US, an increase of 35 percent from 2012. Moreover, 57 percent of them have an annual household income of at least $75,000, making the group attractive to advertisers.

Straws: Caesars, like other Vegas resort operators, begins saying goodbye to single-use plastic straws.

It's all about wellness: CB Insights reports, the $3.7 trillion global wellness economy is exploding, and it's not just affecting food and personal care. Wellness is transforming everything from how gyms operate to the way retailers design clothing to how smart cities are designed. 

Vampire facials: The treatment involves taking the client’s blood and reinjecting the plasma back into their face. Yes, this is happening.

WEF: The future of jobs 2018 http://bit.ly/2N4UOY4

As technological breakthroughs rapidly shift the frontier between the work tasks performed by humans and those performed by machines and algorithms, global labor markets are likely to undergo major transformations. 

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Brigadoon Weekly: ROI, Detroit, Clippers, Behavior, Juventus

Brigadoon Weekly Aug 2018.png

ROI, India, Detroit, Clippers, Behavior, Juventus

Brigadoon Weekly
September 23, 2018
Curation and commentary from 
Marc A. Ross

Reporting from Alexandria, Virginia 

The Weekly  = Enterprise + Culture + Sport + Policy

Brigadoon is Education + Events + Engagement for Entrepreneurs and Thought Leaders.

Subscribe here: 
http://thebrigadoon.com/subscribe/

ROSS RANT


What's the ROI

Famously Steve Jobs was once asked at an Apple shareholder meeting by a shareholder who wanted to get some insights into his most in-depth thinking: “What keeps you awake at night?” Jobs replied, “Shareholder meetings.”

Can you envision Jobs in a shareholder meeting being bogged down by endless questions all focused on ROI?

I don't have fancy shareholder meetings, but I do have sales meetings.

Sales meetings where the question of what is the ROI for someone attending a Brigadoon gathering usually comes up.

The exchange usually proceeds down this path:

Question to me: "What's the ROI of me attending a Brigadoon event?"

Response from me: "I have no idea."

Question to me: "Will the people in the room buy my product?"

Response from me: "I have no idea."

These two responses are usually less than satisfying to the person posing the questions. 

There is usually silence as well. Plus the questioner is generally puzzled, perplexed, and many times perturbed.

Being shaped by consumer environment where the customer is always right, hand-holding is demanded, and orange slices are provided for everyone, such cavalier responses from a seller can be unsettling.

After this breathless, how does this conversation move forward moment, this is how I usually respond:

"If you are interested in having conversations with compelling entrepreneurs and thought leaders in dynamic settings, Brigadoon is probably for you. The ROI of Brigadoon is up to you on how you use the conversations and settings to your enhance your business, mental health, investments, and performance. If you need a clear, from the start ROI, Brigadoon is probably not for you."

From my observation, those Brigadoon attendees that are free from seeking a calculated ROI from the start have the best experiences and leave the gatherings smarter and more energized. Not having a predictable and repeatable ROI for Brigadoon works because the result is divergent and distinctive for each attendee.

It's tempting for those of us selling a product to obsess about providing secure, measurable, and help me explain to my boss what this is results for a customer.

It's tempting to make it easy, black and white, and predictable for customers - it is called industrialization.

It's the difference between dinning with Ronald McDonald and Grant Achatz.

Ronald McDonald spends all his time focused on delivering value meals, predictable experiences, and repeatable french fries.

Grant Achatz spends all his time focused on delivering expensive meals, unpredictable experiences, and unrepeatable french fries.

The market, management, and mainframe reward the industrialist with short-term accolades followed by a relentless need for ever more of the same growth and productivity that got them accolades in the first place.

Today's industrialists define our economy, secure the headlines, get interviewed on CNBC, and win awards from magazines, but they offer very little excitement for tomorrow. Their work makes it easy, black and white, and predictable for customers. It's industrialization.

Some products, services, and outcomes must be designed from the start to alter the culture, eschew ROI, and operate in ways that will ensure the customer must define her ROI that is individually divergent and distinctive.

As long as industrialists are focused on ROI, uncomplicated, black and white, and predictable, there will be a gap for those of us that want to engage in a customer experience that is ambiguous, smoky, and unpredictable.

If you are working in an overly industrialized business, I would recommend adding a little unknown to your offerings. Customers will find the outcome they desire. Customers will be comfortable in finding their value. Customers will want more.

Thinking back to Steve Jobs and the iPhone environment, when you unpack an iPhone, there is no roadmap, no predictive outcome where the device will take you.  Each smartphone experience is divergent and distinctive.

That's the ROI.

-Marc A. Ross | Brigadoon Founder + TLC

Marc A. Ross is the founder of Brigadoon and specializes in thought leader communications and event production. Working with doers, entrepreneurs, and thought leaders, Marc helps them create compelling communications, winning commerce, and powerful connections. 

FIVE ARTICLES TO READ

From ‘why I hate Detroit’ to ‘why I stayed’: Eric Thomas’s 2016 blog went viral. What does he think about his changing city now? https://on.ft.com/2DcvMH1

"Detroiters’ honesty means we have real conversations about the future without sidestepping unpleasant details"

Why the Clippers landed Lee Jenkins as executive director of research and identity: LAT reports, the team announced the hiring of Jenkins, 41, as the executive director of research and identity Monday. In media and NBA circles, the title sparked confusion. To Frank, it is almost beside the point. Jenkins, whose in-depth NBA profiles at Sports Illustrated earned him a reputation as one of the nation’s top sports journalists, clicked so easily with Clippers brass that they believed his skills could benefit the organization in ways that transcend title. https://lat.ms/2xxl5t4

Coca-Cola is eyeing the cannabis market: Bloomberg reports, Coca-Cola says it’s monitoring the nascent industry and is interested in drinks infused with CBD -- the non-psychoactive ingredient in marijuana that treats pain but doesn’t get you high. The Atlanta-based soft drinks maker is in talks with Canadian marijuana producer Aurora Cannabis to develop the beverages. https://bloom.bg/2xBa3mI

How to stay fit forever: 25 tips to keep moving when life gets in the way http://bit.ly/2Oso9NQ

Only human, after all: How evolution left us ill-equipped for modernity: With so much potential for change looming, three books evaluate the body that nature has left us with. https://on.ft.com/2xzGNNk

BRIGADOON EVENTS - FALL 2018 + WINTER 2019

Brigadoon Detroit | Salon Dinner = October 11, 2018

Brigadoon Cincinnati | Salon Dinner = November 1, 2018

Brigadoon Coral Gables | Salon Dinner = January 17, 2019

Brigadoon Sundance 2019 = February 24-26, 2019

More details and ticket information @ thebrigadoon.com

PICS FROM BRIGADOON ANNAPOLIS

Here are some pics from this week's Brigadoon Annapolis event shot by Brendan Kownacki. We enjoyed a spectacular meal at Flamant and an in-depth conversation with Frederik De Pue, followed by a morning sail on the Chesapeake Bay with lectures from Ron Layton and Antoine RJ Wright. Overall a great event and one we will be organizing again in the fall of 2019.

You can see the pics here: http://bit.ly/2MX0hjy

BOOKS

FT & McKinsey business book of the year award: The shortlist https://on.ft.com/2Ou0Cfe

Future of capitalism, from universal basic income to India’s rise, dominates annual prize. 

TRENDS + BUZZ

Cocaine production industry is having a banner year: Coca shrubland is up 17 percent in Colombia to 171,000 hectares, up from 48,000 hectares in 2013.

High school wake up time: 87 percent of American public high schools start before 8:30 am.

Commutes: The average American's commute now stands at 26.9 minutes.

Annoying calls: The FCC estimates that Americans get 2.4 billion unwanted, automated calls every month. 

54: By 2022, 54 percent of all workers will have a “significant” need to boost their skills to deal with advancing technology, according to a new World Economic Forum survey, with over a third requiring additional training of up to six months.

Video game sales in the US increased year over year for the fifth straight month in August.

Social media blamed for the rise in unhappiness among girls: The Times reports, far fewer girls say they are happy than a decade ago, with many blaming social media and exams for making them feel anxious. 

Keep it private: Growth in sales of private-label products have outpaced the sales of branded products by 3x.

Less choice and less thinking consumers: Amazon has beat out most of its competition with a simple philosophy: endless choice at super-low prices. But now, two new trends could be a warning sign for that model. Food, clothes and makeup firms are among sellers that are becoming either highly customized or, at the other extreme, one-size-fits-all, says CB Insights' Zoe Leavitt. The common goal — the elimination of choice, and the confusion that can accompany it, thus challenging the very calling card of massive retailers like Amazon and Walmart.

The death of the cell phone call: Nearly half of all calls will be spam by 2019.

SONG

Milky Chance - Doing Good https://goo.gl/UBdC5A

SPORT

FT: Ronaldo: Why Juventus gambled €100m on a future payday https://on.ft.com/2OrVc4p

“It was the first time that the commercial side and the sporting side of Juventus came together in assessing the costs and benefits [of a signing],” says Mr. Agnelli, a scion of the billionaire family that has owned the club for 95 years. “The opportunity of Ronaldo was thoroughly assessed . . . and it made sense, both on and off the pitch.”

What's the ROI?

Ross Rant March 2018.png

Famously Steve Jobs was once asked at an Apple shareholder meeting by a shareholder who wanted to get some insights into his most in-depth thinking: “What keeps you awake at night?” Jobs replied, “Shareholder meetings.”

Can you envision Jobs in a shareholder meeting being bogged down by endless questions all focused on ROI?

I don't have fancy shareholder meetings, but I do have sales meetings.

Sales meetings where the question of what is the ROI for someone attending a Brigadoon gathering usually comes up.

The exchange usually proceeds down this path:

Question to me: "What's the ROI of me attending a Brigadoon event?"

Response from me: "I have no idea."

Question to me: "Will the people in the room buy my product?"

Response from me: "I have no idea."

These two responses are usually less than satisfying to the person posing the questions. 

There is usually silence as well. Plus the questioner is generally puzzled, perplexed, and many times perturbed.

Being shaped by consumer environment where the customer is always right, hand-holding is demanded, and orange slices are provided for everyone, such cavalier responses from a seller can be unsettling.

After this breathless, how does this conversation move forward moment, this is how I usually respond:

"If you are interested in having conversations with compelling entrepreneurs and thought leaders in dynamic settings, Brigadoon is probably for you. The ROI of Brigadoon is up to you on how you use the conversations and settings to your enhance your business, mental health, investments, and performance. If you need a clear, from the start ROI, Brigadoon is probably not for you."

From my observation, those Brigadoon attendees that are free from seeking a calculated ROI from the start have the best experiences and leave the gatherings smarter and more energized. Not having a predictable and repeatable ROI for Brigadoon works because the result is divergent and distinctive for each attendee.

It's tempting for those of us selling a product to obsess about providing secure, measurable, and help me explain to my boss what this is results for a customer.

It's tempting to make it easy, black and white, and predictable for customers - it is called industrialization.

It's the difference between dinning with Ronald McDonald and Grant Achatz.

Ronald McDonald spends all his time focused on delivering value meals, predictable experiences, and repeatable french fries.

Grant Achatz spends all his time focused on delivering expensive meals, unpredictable experiences, and unrepeatable french fries.

The market, management, and mainframe reward the industrialist with short-term accolades followed by a relentless need for ever more of the same growth and productivity that got them accolades in the first place.

Today's industrialists define our economy, secure the headlines, get interviewed on CNBC, and win awards from magazines, but they offer very little excitement for tomorrow. Their work makes it easy, black and white, and predictable for customers. It's industrialization.

Some products, services, and outcomes must be designed from the start to alter the culture, eschew ROI, and operate in ways that will ensure the customer must define her ROI that is individually divergent and distinctive.

As long as industrialists are focused on ROI, uncomplicated, black and white, and predictable, there will be a gap for those of us that want to engage in a customer experience that is ambiguous, smoky, and unpredictable.

If you are working in an overly industrialized business, I would recommend adding a little unknown to your offerings. Customers will find the outcome they desire. Customers will be comfortable in finding their value. Customers will want more.

Thinking back to Steve Jobs and the iPhone environment, when you unpack an iPhone, there is no roadmap, no predictive outcome where the device will take you.  Each smartphone experience is divergent and distinctive.

That's the ROI.

-Marc A. Ross | Brigadoon Founder + TLC

Marc A. Ross is the founder of Brigadoon and specializes in thought leader communications and event production. Working with doers, entrepreneurs, and thought leaders, Marc helps them create compelling communications, winning commerce, and powerful connections. 

Stop selling by the hour - Start selling by the value created

Ross Rant March 2018.png

Stop selling by the hour - Start selling by the value created

I had some design work done this week.

Design work which in my mind was to be a customized solution and not some commoditized product solution purchased from a faceless designer working via an online marketplace.

True, it was a simple project, and I provided clear direction from the start. 

I knew what I was using for inspiration and what the end state should be. 

I gave crisp examples to inspire the final design outcome.

After being presented with design options, I asked the graphic designer how he wanted to be compensated.

He replied with: "Well, it didn't take me that long so...."

Before he could give me his price, I called a timeout and said: "Come on!"

I said come on because he wasn't valuing the efficiency and ease at which he could craft this design project.

He wasn't valuing his years of undergraduate and graduate graphic design studies.

He wasn't valuing his years of experience working with big and small clients in various sectors.

He wasn't valuing his expertise of pattern matching, seeing this design need before, and the hours he has spent being observant of trends on the streets and in pop culture.

He wasn't valuing the fact that this project didn't take him all that long because he has many years of higher education, many years of professional experience, and many years of observing design trends.

The task was simple for him because he possessed all three of these elements - not because the final product was easy to design.

There should be very little correlation between what we get paid and the amount of time we put in. 

Pricing should be all about outputs and accomplishments.

As entrepreneurs and thought leaders, most of us have three things that we can sell, often mirroring the three main stages of business: starting, existing, and thriving. 

At the beginning of the business, most of us due to lack of confidence or smarts, start by selling time. We sell the inputs of time and materials. 

To reach the next business level of existing, we start selling outputs of deliverables. So instead of charging based on our time, we charge based on the market value of something and begin to command a premium. We trade a price premium for price certainty because we are selling deliverables.

At the third and thriving level of business, when we let go of both of those things, we sell based on the value created. 

At the top-tier of a thriving business, you need to develop revenue and not sales. You are focused on adding value for clients - be it securing gains or cost reductions or other emotional forms of value that your expert solution will deliver. 

To arrive at the third stage of business, your pricing needs to untethered from the inputs of time and materials. 

As you soon as you can move to the third stage you will have a thriving business.

You will move from selling inputs, to next, selling outputs, to finally selling outcomes or value based on, your education, your experience, your expertise, and your efficiency. 

Your million dollar solution may only take a minute to formulate just because you chose to secure many years of education, many years of experience, many years of expertise to be so darn efficient.

-Marc A. Ross | Brigadoon Founder + TLC

Marc A. Ross is the founder of Brigadoon and specializes in thought leader communications and event production. Working with doers, entrepreneurs, and thought leaders, Marc helps them create compelling communications, winning commerce, and powerful connections. 

Brigadoon Weekly: Value Created, Eisenhower Matrix, Gen Z, Stars and Weeds

Brigadoon Weekly Aug 2018.png

Value Created, Eisenhower Matrix, Gen Z, Stars and Weeds

Brigadoon Weekly
September 16, 2018
Curation and commentary from 
Marc A. Ross

Reporting from Alexandria, Virginia 

The Weekly  = Enterprise + Culture + Sport + Policy

Brigadoon is Education + Events + Engagement for Entrepreneurs and Thought Leaders.

Subscribe here: 
http://thebrigadoon.com/subscribe/

ROSS RANT


Stop selling by the hour - Start selling by the value created

I had some design work done this week.

Design work which in my mind was to be a customized solution and not some commoditized product solution purchased from a faceless designer working via an online marketplace.

True, it was a simple project, and I provided clear direction from the start. 

I knew what I was using for inspiration and what the end state should be. 

I gave crisp examples to inspire the final design outcome.

After being presented with design options, I asked the graphic designer how he wanted to be compensated.

He replied with: "Well, it didn't take me that long so...."

Before he could give me his price, I called a timeout and said: "Come on!"

I said come on because he wasn't valuing the efficiency and ease at which he could craft this design project.

He wasn't valuing his years of undergraduate and graduate graphic design studies.

He wasn't valuing his years of experience working with big and small clients in various sectors.

He wasn't valuing his expertise of pattern matching, seeing this design need before, and the hours he has spent being observant of trends on the streets and in pop culture.

He wasn't valuing the fact that this project didn't take him all that long because he has many years of higher education, many years of professional experience, and many years of observing design trends.

The task was simple for him because he possessed all three of these elements - not because the final product was easy to design.

There should be very little correlation between what we get paid and the amount of time we put in. 

Pricing should be all about outputs and accomplishments.

As entrepreneurs and thought leaders, most of us have three things that we can sell, often mirroring the three main stages of business: starting, existing, and thriving. 

At the beginning of the business, most of us due to lack of confidence or smarts, start by selling time. We sell the inputs of time and materials. 

To reach the next business level of existing, we start selling outputs of deliverables. So instead of charging based on our time, we charge based on the market value of something and begin to command a premium. We trade a price premium for price certainty because we are selling deliverables.

At the third and thriving level of business, when we let go of both of those things, we sell based on the value created. 

At the top-tier of a thriving business, you need to develop revenue and not sales. You are focused on adding value for clients - be it securing gains or cost reductions or other emotional forms of value that your expert solution will deliver. 

To arrive at the third stage of business, your pricing needs to untethered from the inputs of time and materials. 

As you soon as you can move to the third stage you will have a thriving business.

You will move from selling inputs, to next, selling outputs, to finally selling outcomes or value based on, your education, your experience, your expertise, and your efficiency. 

Your million dollar solution may only take a minute to formulate just because you chose to secure many years of education, many years of experience, many years of expertise to be so darn efficient.

-Marc A. Ross | Brigadoon Founder + TLC

Marc A. Ross is the founder of Brigadoon and specializes in thought leader communications and event production. Working with doers, entrepreneurs, and thought leaders, Marc helps them create compelling communications, winning commerce, and powerful connections. 

FIVE ARTICLES TO READ

Kara Swisher: The real Google censorship scandal: It’s not about right-wing Americans. It’s about China.https://nyti.ms/2Oi8fFv

"sources familiar with the situation say the calculus is less about data and more about just missing out on a lucrative business opportunity. Either way, these mercenary concerns are exactly what Google once seemed to argue against in China. Given the shift, I’d like the company to channel those often rowdy and raw all-hands meetings and transparently explain to its employees and users and regulators what it is willing to compromise in its return to China."

NYT: The youth sports mega-complex comes to town, hoping teams will follow https://nyti.ms/2OhFFnX

A study published by Utah State University in 2014 found that American families spent an average of $2,292 each year on youth sports.

How tech is drawing shoppers back to bricks-and-mortar stores: WSJ reports, innovative dressing rooms. Apps to choose clothes in advance. Introducing the digitally enhanced shopping trip. https://on.wsj.com/2NaFcHB

Consumers want memorable and Instagram-worthy experiences when shopping. 

Scotland’s Next wave of whisky distillerieshttps://bloom.bg/2N5ofyo

More than 50 on the horizon. 

Gen Z is coming to your office. Get ready to adapt. The generation now entering the workforce is sober, industrious and driven by money. They are also socially awkward and timid about taking the reins. https://on.wsj.com/2M8AmFd

BRIGADOON EVENTS - FALL 2018 + WINTER 2019

Brigadoon Annapolis | Salon Dinner + Lectures = September 20-21, 2018

Brigadoon Detroit | Salon Dinner = October 11, 2018

Brigadoon Cincinnati | Salon Dinner = November 1, 2018

Brigadoon Scotland 2018 = November 11-13, 2018

Brigadoon Coral Gables | Salon Dinner = January 17, 2019

Brigadoon Sundance 2019 = February 24-26, 2019

More details and ticket information @ thebrigadoon.com 

PRODUCTIVITY

“The most urgent decisions are rarely the most important ones.” -- Dwight Eisenhower

To help with decision making, consider The Eisenhower Matrix

A simple decision-making tool that you can draw on a napkin and start using today.

The Eisenhower Matrix has four parts, which you use to categorize the work in front of you:

* Important, but not urgent

* Urgent and important

* Urgent but not important

* Not important and not urgent


GUEST POST

Stars and weeds

Vision casting is one of my favorite things to do. I like spitballing ideas. You’ve heard the phrase, throw pasta at the wall and see what sticks. I do that too. On a recent conversation with a business partner and mentor, I heard another phrase: some people are stargazers, others are weed whackers. Few manage both well.

We’re talking about the visionary (stargazers) and the integrator (weed whackers). Which one are you? Pick one. You can exhibit aspects of both, but you will always be strongest on one side of the gap or the other. 

Me? I’m a visionary. I think my mentor is too. We both lament over the need for a loyal geek, our idyllic version of the quintessential weed whacker. Someone who tucks in a sweatshirt or isn’t bothered by shoelaces that are clearly too long. Perennial finger smudge on the glasses? Check. That’s the guy we’re talking about…very happy in a spreadsheet and willing to take a blueprint and build. Motto: data > people.

The visionary looks up. She looks past the clouds and into the future. She inspires and emboldens. She reads tea leaves. Furtive glances into the future of her chosen sector or line of business are a regular occurrence. A lot of us entrepreneurs are visionaries because we simply can’t help it. Hardwiring has something to do with it, but so does nurture.

An entrepreneur must get up every morning and manufacture a daily dose of irrational optimism. It’s not clear to me how any of us got started on that path, but I don’t question it after nearly two decades of this morning ritual. If you’re smiling right now, you know what I mean. If you don’t see the point, it’s okay. You’re probably an integrator. But we need you more than we need the optimism.

This need to generate some sense of it’s gonna be fine — when there is no cash flow, no real product, no traction, no marketing, no team, nothing — out of nothing is why we visionaries have such a hard time getting into the weeds. 

Muster confidence in the face of a daunting market. Try locking eyes with someone who is seriously considering seed investment; if you look away first, you’re not confident enough. 

Let’s talk weed whacking for a bit before wrapping up. I lost my integrator in December of 2017; we had worked together for six years. It was a bittersweet departure. He was on to bigger and better. I had poured everything I could into him and was proud to see him go. But he left behind a hole I have been forced to fill. 

Integrators are fundamental and necessary for a small business to grow into something more substantial. Visionaries who work hard on integration can only go so far. We can pile up blueprints and gather resources, but an integrator is what it takes to build. 

What are you?

- Samuel Logan | Brigadoon Professional

Samuel Logan is a husband, father of three, entrepreneur, traveler, published author, and speaker. 

TRENDS + BUZZ

Paying is voluntary at this selfie-friendly store: NYT reports, Drug Store, a new health-drink outlet in New York, is betting that customers will pay by text message after grabbing a bottle.

@adweak: BREAKING:  Study finds no one quite sure what the hell “thought leader” means

The Times: Teenagers choose gaming over friends and family

Teenagers spend almost half an hour less each day meeting their friends and talking with their family than a generation ago and have filled the gap by playing computer games, a study has found.

It found that on average 18-year-olds spend 27 minutes less each day visiting pubs or cafés, meeting friends and family and talking on the telephone than they did at the start of the millennium. They also spend about 26 minutes less a day watching television or films or listening to the radio.


AFP: US teens prefer remote chats to face-to-face meeting: study

Some 35 percent of kids aged 13 to 17 years old said they would rather send a text than meet up with people, which received 32 percent.

More than two-thirds of American teens choose remote communication -- including texting, social media, video conversation, and phone conversation -- when they can, according to the study.


SONG

Tom Petty And The Heartbreakers - Refugeehttps://goo.gl/vmxc5B 

4 Spots Open | Frederik De Pue Added to the Program | Brigadoon Annapolis

Brigadoon Annapolis_2018.png

Brigadoon Annapolis | Salon Dinner + Sailing + Lectures

September 20-21, 2018

Annapolis, Maryland

 

You're invited - Join Brigadoon founder Marc Ross and co-host Samuel Logan for a special Brigadoon event in Annapolis, Maryland next week
 

We will gather for a special dinner at Flamant on Thursday, September 20 and enjoy a morning cruise of the Chesapeake Bay on Friday, September 21.

Attendees will partake in a moderated conversation on the trends shaping America's diet and food choices on Thursday evening followed by lectures on the deck of the Liberte schooner during our morning sail Friday covering digital humanism design and triple bottom line investing.

Speakers:

Frederik De Pue 

Executive Chef + Owner
Flamant

Frederik is a notable culinary talent, with an exceptional eye for detail and honest inspiration behind his food and menus. He translates his global culinary experiences into each dish he prepares and endeavors to create satisfying and sophisticated food.

In 2013 Frederik opened Table, a restaurant located in Washington’s Shaw neighborhood. Table earned praise for its thoughtful, French-inspired fare, and was nominated as one of Bon Appetit’s Top 50 New Restaurant in the country. In 2017 he opened restaurant Flamant and has won over local Annapolitans and guests that come from the Baltimore and DC areas. Flamant received 5 stars from the Baltimore Sun, and the Washington Post recently called it the best place to dine in Annapolis. 


Antoine RJ Wright

Director of UX Engagements
Mindboard, Inc.

Called "the Beyonce of UX," or "the guy from the future" during various stops, his skills appear with user/participant design and organizational analysis across multiple fields - occasionally stopping long enough to watch the stars, or draw them for organizations looking to reach to different heights.


Ron Layton

Founder & CEO
Light Years IP

An intellectual property (IP) businessman who draws on his experience in creating retail products based on IP assets and marketing 10m retail units over 15 years in business. He has designed IP business strategies for Africa and has worked in 30 developing countries.

 

Why attend?


✔️ This will be an intimate event - only 4 spots are open - and will allow for an open and frank discussion with all participants.

✔️ Enjoy a discussion with fellow attendees and our special guests on topics shaping business and policy in an informal and relaxed setting.

✔️ Brigadoon gatherings are all powerpoint free and governed by Chatham House rules to ensure maximum conversations.

Cost: $345.00 per ticket

Buy your ticket here: 

Brigadoon Annapolis | Salon Dinner + Lectures
 

Schedule:

Thursday - September 20, 2018

Dinner @ Flamant

Reception
6:30 - 7:15 pm

Dinner
7:15 - 8:15 pm

Dessert
8:15 - 8:45 pm


Friday - September 21, 2018

Chesapeake Bay Cruise @ The Liberte

Sailing + Discussions
9:00 am - 12:00 noon


Suggested Hotel + Room Block

Annapolis Waterfront Hotel, Autograph Collection
80 Compromise Street
Annapolis, MD 21401

Not all champions win a championship

Brigadoon Weekly Aug 2018.png

Not all champions win a championship

Brigadoon Weekly
September 9, 2018
Curation and commentary from Marc A. Ross

Reporting from Alexandria, Virginia

The Weekly  = Enterprise + Culture + Sport + Policy

Brigadoon is Education + Events + Engagement for Entrepreneurs and Thought Leaders.

Subscribe here: http://thebrigadoon.com/subscribe/


ROSS RANT


Not all champions win a championship

“recognize certain traits that seem to be in every champion: passion, commitment, confidence, pride in performance, high standards of excellence, relentlessness, perseverance, and the ability to perform in adverse circumstances.” ― Nick Saban

As the football season in America formerly kicks-off, many fans, coaches, and pundits will be talking about winning championships when in reality only a handful of teams have a chance to secure the top trophy.

Going back to 1998 in the NFL, only twelve teams have won the Super Bowl, and five of those teams won multiple championships.

It is even worse in college football where 130 schools compete in the first division. Consider in the last twenty years the national championship has gone to only twelve schools, with five schools claiming multiple national championships.

Across the pond in England and Wales, only six clubs have won the Premier League since its inception in 1992. 

See the pattern?

Lots of football games played, but only a handful of champions.

Most of the teams playing this weekend have no chance of winning a championship and frankly are already eliminated from hoisting the silverware.

Yes, the Detroit Lions or the Miami Dolphins could win the next Super Bowl, but it is highly unlikely.

And sure, across decades of contests, a team like Leicester City FC (the club won the 2015–16 Premier League with preseason odds of 5000 to 1) will win a major title, but it is more of a magical carpet-ride fluke than a pattern.

So why do thousands of football players suit-up, put on the pads, tie-up the cleats knowing that won't win a championship?

It is more important for them to be a champion than to win a championship.

As the famed golden-headed Fighting Irish of Notre Dame enter their football stadium in South Bend, they are reminded to "play like a champion today."

They are reminded not to win a championship, but to play like a champion.

Steven Pressfield calls this mindset turning pro - or moving from amateur to professional. Moving from the gratification of winning a championship to the satisfaction of being an intentional and consistent champion.

When we decide to play like a champion and be a pro we find our real power and focus.

Winning a championship is impacted by numerous factors, events, situations, and outcomes, that we cannot fully control.

Being a champion and a pro consistently is something we can fully control.

Being a champion and a pro allows us to become who we always were intended to be.

Make the mind-shift this week to embrace professionalism and to live out as a champion.

Lose yourself in your work and in the moment. 

Be a champion. 

-Marc A. Ross | Brigadoon Founder + TLC

Marc A. Ross is the founder of Brigadoon and specializes in thought leader communications and event production. Working with doers, entrepreneurs, and thought leaders, Marc helps them create compelling communications, winning commerce, and powerful connections. 

FIVE ARTICLES TO READ

Ten things I never knew about Las Vegas until I ran a high-roller suite: A stint managing premier client relations at the Cosmopolitan revealed secrets that probably should stay in Vegas. Oh well. https://bloom.bg/2NVtgWB

Richard A. Friedman: The big myth about teenage anxiety: Relax: The digital age is not wrecking your kid's brain. https://nyti.ms/2M60b9d

Unilever confronts the ‘chairdrobe’ as consumers rethink laundry: Reuters reports, on any given day, the chair in Raven Rose’s Ewing, New Jersey, bedroom might be draped with shirts, pants or pyjamas. Marketers at consumer goods giant Unilever are calling it the “chairdrobe” - the heap of lightly worn clothes that often ends up crumpling one’s go-to garments. It’s a familiar sight in the bedrooms of some 60 percent of millennials – 22- to 37-year-olds earning more than a quarter of the world’s income - who approach laundry differently from other age groups, Unilever’s market research shows. For decades, Unilever and Procter & Gamble (PG.N), the industry leader that created the best-selling brand, Tide, have pitched new and improved laundry detergents and fabric softeners, primarily to women using washing machines. But millennials are less loyal to traditional brands and have new demands, including that products save time and be environmentally sustainable. https://reut.rs/2O3J2yK

The new geography of innovation: Why startups are leaving Silicon Valley: The Economist reports, its primacy as a technology hub is on the wane. That is cause for concern. https://econ.st/2PmYKFm

The Bay Area has the 19th-largest economy in the world, ranking above Switzerland and Saudi Arabia.

Haute wheels — could Peloton’s £2,000 exercise bike change the way we work out? https://on.ft.com/2PlhpBq

BRIGADOON EVENTS - FALL 2018

Brigadoon Annapolis | Salon Dinner + Lectures = September 20-21, 2018

Only four spots left.

Brigadoon Detroit | Salon Dinner = October 11, 2018

Only seven spots left.

Brigadoon Cincinnati | Salon Dinner = November 1, 2018

Brigadoon Scotland 2018 = November 11-13, 2018

Brigadoon Sundance 2019 = February 24-26, 2019

33% of the spots are sold.

More details and ticket information @ thebrigadoon.com/events

GEAR

This Austrian machine is the best all-terrain truck you've never heard of http://bit.ly/2oUCXtw

SONG

A Tribe Called Quest - Footprints (Remix) (Audio) ft. CeeLo Green http://bit.ly/2N4XKIw

STAY

The Luxury Travel Intelligence (LTI) top 12 luxury hotel brands for 2018:

1. Aman
2. Oetker Collection
3. Six Senses
4. Belmond
5. Mandarin Oriental
6. Auberge
7. Four Seasons
8. Soho House
9. One & Only
10. St. Regis
11. Rosewood
12. The Luxury Collection


SPORT

The tech generation goes to wilderness therapy: A guide at a wilderness therapy organization observes an increasing number of teens coming in to treat technology addiction. http://bit.ly/2MfKIDg

From zero to trail hero: Whether you are building from scratch, or rebuilding after a break, a few principles can help you set up a fast-and-fun running future. http://bit.ly/2MeheWk