Buzz + Ideas

Commentary + Concepts

Did you know?

Having kids: The current share of US adults who see three or more children as the ideal family size is the highest since 1997.

“People want to actually share a lot more, but they don’t want it to hang on the gallery wall.” -- Instagram CEO Kevin Systrom on why Instagram Stories has proven to be a great feature addition to the platform. 

The psychology behind why you always want to sit in the same seat https://qz.com/1349508/

"By establishing a personal territory, occupants avoid the daily need of negotiating with the external environmental. Because they’re not wasting mental energy making themselves psychological comfortable in a new position every day, it makes it easier for them to achieve their goals, like concentrating on the lecture at hand."

Brigadoon by land and by water | Annapolis, Maryland | Sep. 20-21

Brigadoon Annapolis | Salon Dinner + Lectures

September 20-21, 2018

Annapolis, Maryland

Please join Brigadoon founder Marc Ross and co-host Samuel Logan for a special Brigadoon event in Annapolis, Maryland this September.

We will gather for a special dinner at Flamant on Thursday, September 20 and enjoy a morning cruise of the Chesapeake Bay on Friday, September 21.

Lectures for this event will take place on the deck of the Liberte schooner during our morning sail. Digital humanism design and triple bottom line investing will be the focus of the discussions.

Speakers:

Antoine RJ Wright

Director of UX Engagements
Mindboard, Inc.

Called "the Beyonce of UX," or "the guy from the future" during various stops, his skills appear with user/participant design and organizational analysis across multiple fields - occasionally stopping long enough to watch the stars, or draw them for organizations looking to reach to different heights.


Ron Layton

Founder & CEO
Light Years IP

An intellectual property (IP) businessman who draws on his experience in creating retail products based on IP assets and marketing 10m retail units over 15 years in business. He has designed IP business strategies for Africa and has worked in 30 developing countries.

Why attend?


✔️ This will be an intimate event - only 8 spots are open - and will allow for an open and frank discussion with all participants.

✔️ Enjoy a discussion with fellow attendees and our special guests on topics shaping business and policy in an informal and relaxed setting.

✔️ Brigadoon gatherings are all powerpoint free and governed by Chatham House rules to ensure maximum conversations.

Ticket sales end on August 20, 2018.

Cost: $345.00 per ticket

Buy you ticker here: 

Brigadoon Annapolis | Salon Dinner + Lectures
 

Schedule:

Thursday - September 20, 2018

Dinner @ Flamant

Reception
6:30 - 7:15 pm

Dinner
7:15 - 8:15 pm

Dessert
8:15 - 8:45 pm


Friday - September 21, 2018

Chesapeake Bay Cruise @ The Liberte

Sailing + Discussions
9:00 am - 12:00 noon

Brigadoon Annapolis 2018_Salon Dinner_Lectures.png

Did you know?

@jasonfried: In the same way that sound isn’t music, traffic isn’t audience.

People killed in 2015 by:

Mosquitoes: 830,000
Humans: 580,000
Snakes: 60,000
Sandflies: 24.200
Dogs: 17,400
Kissing Bugs: 8,000
Freshwater snails: 4,400
Scorpions: 3,500
Tsetse flies: 3,500
Roundworms: 2,700
Tapeworms: 1,600

HT GatesNotes


Think tanks per country, 2017:

US: 1872
China: 512
UK: 444
India: 293
Germany: 225
France: 197
Argentina: 146
Japan: 116
Russia: 103
Canada: 100

HT University of Pennsylvania

 

COTD: The world's fastest high-speed trains

America's most advanced and fanciest train, the Acela, when moving through Baltimore, needs to slow down 30 mph. The train needs to brake often as it goes around sharp turns and through a tunnel built shortly after the Civil War. For the rest of the world, they enjoy modern trains that move at high speeds and on infrastructure built this century.

Trains.jpg

Replacing presentations with conversations

Brigadoon.jpg

At the core of all Brigadoon events is the belief in the power of conversations.

Brigadoon believes there is power in engaging with subject matter experts from fields different than our own to help with our personal creative skills development.

Sure, as a speaker, when you make the Mad Men presentation with sizzle and flash wrapped up with the big showstopper reveal, it may feel useful to you, but it actually does little to advance understanding or securing solutions.

Standing before a room full of interesting, smart professionals with a slide deck to reveal data on your terms, showing off, and making it all about you is a disservice to your audience.

Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi is the author of the seminal book Flow, and he has spent decades studying happiness and creativity. 

Csikszentmihalyi believes creativity is the ability to see and bring a new perspective to a problem with a solution that has meaning. During flow, people typically experience deep enjoyment, creativity, and total engagement.

The idea of flow is being in the zone, in the groove, in the barrel. 

The flow state is an optimal state of natural motivation, where a person is fully immersed in what they are doing.

Advancing slides is not a flow state.

Conversing with an audience is a flow state.

Much of the talk surrounding what is typically thought of as creativity is limited and restricted.

Csikszentmihalyi believes creativity is not the ability to write, draw, poet, or sculpt - these skills as personal creativity.

Csikszentmihalyi believes creativity comes by looking at things differently, hearing things differently, tasting things differently. 

Creativity demands immersion with conversations and the ability to think on your feet.

When a subject matter expert can bring a fresh perspective to a problem, they also can go with the flow, engage in conversations, and respond to whatever the audience throws at them. 

Brigadoon events curate conversations where the discussion leader starts by sharing their expertise, responding to the audience, having the ability to react, and then moving the audience into flow.

Finding solutions, being creative, expanding learning demands presence.

Man Men was a television show, it ain't real world - at least today's world.

You can't present and be present at the same time.

Drop the deck and have a conversation.

-Marc A. Ross
Brigadoon Founder + TLC

Did you know?

Ten.png

FT's Business Book of the Year 2018 — the longlisthttps://on.ft.com/2MH5X2b

The share of British adults owning a:

Desktop PC

2008: 69%
2018: 28%

Smartphone

2008: 17%
2018: 78%

HT BBC


US EV sales: More than 152,000 plug-in electric vehicles have sold in the US so far this year, putting 2018 on track for record sales.

Drop the Deck, 2,000-year-old Roads, GQ, How to Make Friends, Banana Slugs

Brigadoon Weekly Aug 2018.png

Drop the Deck, 2,000-year-old Roads, GQ, How to Make Friends, Banana Slugs

Brigadoon Weekly
August 12, 2018
Curation and commentary from Marc A. Ross

Reporting from Alexandria, Virginia

Brigadoon Weekly  = Enterprise + Culture + Sport + Policy

Brigadoon is Education + Events + Engagement for Doers, Entrepreneurs, and Thought Leaders.

Subscribe here: http://thebrigadoon.com/subscribe/


ROSS RANT


Replacing presentations with conversations

At the core of all Brigadoon events is the belief in the power of conversations.

Brigadoon believes there is power in engaging with subject matter experts from fields different than our own to help with our personal creative skills development.

Sure, as a speaker, when you make the Mad Men presentation with sizzle and flash wrapped up with the big showstopper reveal, it may feel useful to you, but it actually does little to advance understanding or securing solutions.

Standing before a room full of interesting, smart professionals with a slide deck to reveal data on your terms, showing off, and making it all about you is a disservice to your audience.

Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi is the author of the seminal book Flow, and he has spent decades studying happiness and creativity. 

Csikszentmihalyi believes creativity is the ability to see and bring a new perspective to a problem with a solution that has meaning. During flow, people typically experience deep enjoyment, creativity, and total engagement.

The idea of flow is being in the zone, in the groove, in the barrel. 

The flow state is an optimal state of natural motivation, where a person is fully immersed in what they are doing.

Advancing slides is not a flow state.

Conversing with an audience is a flow state.

Much of the talk surrounding what is typically thought of as creativity is limited and restricted.

Csikszentmihalyi believes creativity is not the ability to write, draw, poet, or sculpt - these skills as personal creativity.

Csikszentmihalyi believes creativity comes by looking at things differently, hearing things differently, tasting things differently. 

Creativity demands immersion with conversations and the ability to think on your feet.

When a subject matter expert can bring a fresh perspective to a problem, they also can go with the flow, engage in conversations, and respond to whatever the audience throws at them. 

Brigadoon events curate conversations where the discussion leader starts by sharing their expertise, responding to the audience, having the ability to react, and then moving the audience into flow.

Finding solutions, being creative, expanding learning demands presence.

Man Men was a television show, it ain't real world - at least today's world.

You can't present and be present at the same time.

Drop the deck and have a conversation.

-Marc A. Ross
Brigadoon Founder + TLC


FIVE ARTICLES TO READ

WP: How 2,000-year-old roads predict modern-day prosperityhttps://wapo.st/2MevyT0

"Prosperity begets prosperity: On a global level, economists and historians have shown that places that prospered 100, 500, even 1,000 years ago tend to be more economically developed today."

Starbucks shows that the opportunities for growth are in Guangzhou, not Seattle https://bloom.bg/2M8jPW1

The Atlantic: How to make friends, according to sciencehttp://bit.ly/2M7j935

To begin, don’t dismiss the humble acquaintance.

@AdamMGrant: On average, it takes 50 hours of interaction to go from acquaintance to friend and 200 hours to get to close friend.

Real friendships rarely happen overnight. They build over time through sharing moments of joy and moments of heartache.


Economist: Silicon Valley gets queasy about Chinese moneyhttps://econ.st/2MyPyNd

"China’s ability to invest billions into American startups looks uncertain"

Bloomberg: PepsiCo’s Indra Nooyi in her own words: ‘No one has a lock on ideas’ https://bloom.bg/2KC0Gad

The world has gotten more complex, more volatile. Anyone who wants to be CEO has a healthy dose of four things:

1. IQ = great brains and ability to absorb a lot of material

2. EQ = you have to hold onto people and make them feel they are really part of the company

3. GQ = a global understanding and empathy. You have to be willing to go into every country and be a citizen of that country. If you don’t have the ability to be local in every country, whatever your business, you won’t be able to engage people from that country.

4. It’s a cycle: you’ve got to be a lifelong student. Just because you’re a CEO doesn’t mean you can stop learning. 


BRIGADOON SCOTLAND 2018

Brigadoon Scotland 2018 = November 11-13, 2018

More details and ticket information @ thebrigadoon.com/events

TRENDS

PWC: What will work look like in 2030?

Imagining four radically different scenarios for how companies will manage people and how people will manage their work and careers.

Red World - individualism and fragmentation reign, small is powerful. Technology allows tiny businesses to tap into the vast reservoirs of information, skills, and financing that were formerly available only to large organizations, and it gives them power and incredible reach. Innovation and people are inseparable, which will trickle down to how companies find, manage and reward workers.

Blue World - individualized and integrated world, global corporations take center stage, becoming larger, more powerful, and more influential than ever — some even have more sway than nation states. Companies see their size and influence as the best way to protect their prized profit margins against intense competition from their peers and aggressive new market entrants.

Green World — collective and integrated — is driven by the need for a powerful social conscience. Reacting to public opinion, increasingly scarce natural resources, and stringent international regulations, companies push a strong ethical and ecological agenda. Social conscience, environmental responsibility, diversity, human rights and fairness are corporate imperatives.

Yellow World — in which collectivist impulses thrive in a fragmented world — workers and companies seek out greater meaning and relevance. Humanness is highly valued. Workers find flexibility, autonomy, and fulfilment, working for organizations with strong social and ethical records. There’s a strong desire to contribute to the common good.

Read the full report here: PWC: Workforce of the future: The competing forces shaping 2030 https://pwc.to/2MuHCwb

DOCUMENTARY

EAT. RACE. WIN. is a behind-the-scenes, on and off-the-bike adventure into the biggest annual sporting event on the planet: The Tour de France. Known as the Queen of Performance Cooking, Chef Hannah Grant takes you on her race within the race, sourcing fuel-packed food for Australia's pro cycling team, Orica-Scott, as Sports Director Matthew White encourages his nine riders to victory.

Watch a clip here: https://imdb.to/2MHqrr

PODCAST

Knowledge @ Wharton: Amazon's core product = Convenience: Amazon sells more goods than any one person could count – but the e-commerce giant’s true “core product” is convenience, and how quickly it can get an order from customers’ virtual shopping carts to their real-life doorsteps.

Part of what makes it so easy for Amazon to offer two-day or even same-day shipping to customers is its vast network of distribution centers, which are located across the U.S. and store and ship products to their final destinations. New research from Wharton business economics and public policy professor Katja Seim takes a closer look at how significantly expanding that distribution center network over the past decade has been key to Amazon’s growth strategy.

Seim recently spoke to Knowledge@Wharton about her paper, “Economies of Density in E-Commerce: A Study of Amazon’s Fulfillment Center Network,” which was co-authored with Cornell’s Jean-Francois Houde and Penn State’s Peter Newberry.

You can listen to the podcast here: https://whr.tn/2KRkfeC

SONG

The Tragically Hip - Ahead By A Century https://goo.gl/tJBgwL

SPORT

NYT: A dream ended on a mountain road: The cyclists and the ISIS militants https://nyti.ms/2MjuCwu

Make time to read.

LAT: Cheer, cheer for the Banana Slugs? Earwigs? Prune Packers? California teams go nuts on sports nicknameshttps://lat.ms/2MnQd3L

SI: Premier League rankings: Separating the contenders from the relegation fodder https://on.si.com/2OUXby

Did you know?

Do.png

Chinese cars top auto sales in Chile: Chinese-made cars for the first time topped auto sales in Chile in the first half of the year.

Voice powered purchasing: Only two percent of Amazon Alexa users have bought anything using their voice in 2018. 

Whenever I find an Alexa in a friend's home, I promptly place orders for snowmobiles, air conditioners, jelly beans, and bubble bath soap. It's funny when all this stuff arrives unexpectedly.

Hearables: The explosive growth of their AI voice assistants has Google, Apple, and Amazon racing to put your entire smartphone in an earpiece.

Audio = Huge

Shenzhen: The Silicon Valley of Hardware (documentary) http://bit.ly/2MoCgm4

Cruising is a $126 billion industry with plenty of room to grow. The Cruise Lines International Association says that only about 20 percent of Americans have taken cruises, and the number is smaller for Europeans and smaller still for Asians. 

Google is in talks with Tencent and Inspur to bring its cloud business to China.

@THRGlobal: Disney’s #ChristopherRobin won't get China release due to a crackdown on the Winnie the Pooh character

Attention economy: Google’s YouTube, Google and Waze combined to account for 34.2% of all time on digital media in June, according to Pivotal Research analyst Brian Wieser.

Google increases its foothold into America's daily routines - it's all about routine and habits.

Did you know?

Products.png

The $300 million plan to farm salmon in the middle of the ocean: Bloomberg reports, the semi-submersible Ocean Farm 1 off the coast of Norway can hold 1.5 million fish.

Boston-area startups are on pace to overtake NYC venture totals: TechCrunch reports, after years of trailing New York City in total annual venture investment, Massachusetts is taking the lead in 2018. Venture investment in the Boston metro area hit $5.2 billion so far this year, on track to be the highest annual total in years. The Massachusetts numbers year-to-date are about 15 percent higher than the New York City total. 

China produces 50% of the world’s cannabis: Most of its crop is non-psychotropic hemp, used for fabrics, medicine, and recreation.

9 astronauts: Nine NASA astronauts — five of whom flew on the space shuttle — have been announced as the crew of new commercial spacecrafts built by Boeing and SpaceX. Beginning next year, these crafts will head toward the International Space Station in the first manned missions from the U.S. since the shuttle program ended seven years ago.

Omega-3 supplements: A $15 billion industry that is growing at an annual rate of 7 percent. However, an analysis of 79 studies with an aggregate 100,000 participants found omega-3 consumption has little or no effect on promoting heart health. 
 

Social Media Marketing, Psychographics, E-sports, Ocean Plastic

Brigadoon Weekly Aug 2018.png

Social Media Marketing, Psychographics, E-sports, Ocean Plastic

Brigadoon Weekly
August 5, 2018
Curation and commentary from Marc A. Ross

Reporting from Alexandria, Virginia

Brigadoon Weekly  = Enterprise + Culture + Sport + Policy

Brigadoon is Education + Events + Engagement for Entrepreneurs and Thought Leaders.

Subscribe here: http://thebrigadoon.com/subscribe/


ROSS RANT

Social media — what is it good for?

Social media marketing has been the hottest marketing concept for the past decade. 

And why not?

With just a little effort, the marketing machine complex has amazingly shifted the production and creativity to a workforce that does all the heavy lifting for free.

Free.

Consumer-generated content, for free.

Direct to consumer engagement, for free.

Friends and family telling what to buy, where to eat, what to watch, all for free.

But is social media marketing losing steam or are we at the pioneer stage of these tools?

Earlier this year Pew Research dropped their annual report on Social Media Use in the United States.

And to no one’s surprise, a majority of Americans use Facebook and YouTube, and young adults are unusually heavy users of Snapchat and Instagram. The survey of US adults finds that the social media landscape in early 2018 is defined by a mix of long-standing trends and newly emerging narratives.

As has been the case since the Pew began surveying about the use of different social media in 2012, Facebook remains the primary platform for most Americans. But the social media story extends well beyond Facebook. The video-sharing site YouTube is now used by nearly three-quarters of US adults and 94% of 18- to 24-year-olds.

But there are pronounced differences in the use of various social media platforms within the young adult population as well. Americans ages 18 to 24 are substantially more likely to use platforms such as Snapchat, Instagram, and Twitter even when compared with those in their mid- to late-20s.

As was true in previous surveys of social media use, there is a substantial amount of overlap between users of the various sites measured in this survey. Most notably, a significant majority of users of each of these social platforms also indicate that they use Facebook and YouTube. But this “reciprocity” extends to other sites as well. For instance, roughly three-quarters of both Twitter (73%) and Snapchat (77%) users also indicate that they use Instagram.

This overlap is broadly indicative of the fact that many Americans use multiple social platforms. Roughly three-quarters of the public (73%) uses more than one of the eight platforms measured in this survey, and the typical (median) American uses three of these sites.

As might be expected, younger adults tend to use a greater variety of social media platforms. The median 18- to 29-year-old uses four of these platforms, but that figure drops to three among 30- to 49-year-olds, to two among 50- to 64-year-olds and one among those 65 and older.

So is social media marketing still a thing?

Yes.

But what does this social media thing mean for marketers, communicators, and advocates?

A few ideas.

Americans might say in polite company they don’t love social media, but their activity says otherwise as they use these tools and use them a lot. Second, social media users take advantage of multiple platforms and embrace their unique tweaks. Finally, it may be early days of social media, but there is a lot of content and distraction out there — and frankly, most of it is junk food for the brain.

For marketers, communicators, and advocates to take advantage of these tools they must think reinforce, reward, recognize, refresh, and research.

Also, your content must be outstanding because the consumer has multiple channels for distraction, others want your audience, and if the user doesn’t feel special, someone else will give them a home.

And most importantly, more and more content is being produced daily. Just like this Ross Rant, content will be easily created and then placed on a minimum of six social media and digital platforms.

So keep on using social media marketing but make sure your content and engagement reinforces, rewards, recognizes, refreshes, and is well researched.

If you want more, you can access the full report here: https://goo.gl/rWdo9g

READING LIST

What the team at a16z is reading this summerhttp://bit.ly/2MeyRGJ

FIVE ARTICLES TO READ

What is psychographics? Understanding the 'dark arts’ of marketing that brought down Cambridge Analytica: Although it came to light with the Cambridge Analytica scandal and 2016 US presidential election, psychographic marketing may be even more effective in commercial rather than political advertising. And it's already more prevalent than you might think. http://bit.ly/2MiCSJS

The world's most beautiful libraries – in pictures: In a new Taschen book, the Italian photographer Massimo Listri travels around the world to some of the oldest libraries, revealing a treasure trove of unique and imaginative architecture. http://bit.ly/2KjGWYS

American land use: Here's how America uses all that land to feed itself, power the economy and extract value for business and pleasure. https://bloom.bg/2LQLvyl

Hypnotic mass phenomena: Peter Thiel is one of Silicon Valley’s bigger-than-life characters. Now he is leaving the epicenter of the tech industry. A conversation on human herd behavior, successful investment, Donald Trump’s genius, homosexuality, and death. http://bit.ly/2LZrAKs

Vivienne Ming: ‘The professional class is about to be blindsided by AI'https://on.ft.com/2NRxQoo

"Ming has done research, using a database of 122m US workers, that shows how conventional hiring measures, which usually home in on credentials from a handful of schools or the impressions taken from one-on-one interviews, have little to do with workplace success."

BRIGADOON EVENTS - FALL 2018

Brigadoon Annapolis | Salon Dinner + Lectures = September 20-21, 2018 | $345

Brigadoon Detroit | Salon Dinner = October 11, 2018 | $125

Brigadoon Cincinnati | Salon Dinner = November 1, 2018 | $125

Brigadoon Scotland 2018 = November 11-13, 2018 | $800

More details and ticket information @ thebrigadoon.com/events

TRENDS

Media consumption: The latest numbers from Nielsen show that on average American adults spend 11.1 hours every day consuming media, up 19 minutes over the previous quarter. 

-- 92 percent of adults listen to radio in an average week

-- 88 percent watch television

-- 79 percent mess around on a smartphone

-- 60 percent on a computer

-- 15 percent on a game console


Ocean plastic: More than 80% of marine plastic pollution comes from Asia

Degrading plastics emit greenhouse gases: study: AFP reports, a study in the journal PLOS ONE on Wednesday found that degrading plastics emit powerful greenhouse gases like methane and ethylene, and are a previously unaccounted-for source of these heat-trapping pollutants. Plastic water bottles, shopping bags, industrial plastics and food containers were all tested as part of the study.

“It got to a point where it would be far easier to build a technology company that does marketing than to try to change a big legacy business into that.” -- Havas CEO David Jones on rethinking the traditional agency model.

Does packaging matter? In a world of e-commerce, brands no longer need packaging to catch shoppers' eyes. Instead, online platforms lets brands use photos, videos, user-generated content, and more to promote their goods. 

Biz trip for work and fun: Business and leisure travel are becoming increasingly blurred.

PODCAST

Wired To Lead™ podcast with Brigadoon Founder Marc A. Ross: Earlier this year I joined Perry Smith and Cameron Gott on the Avalon Institute’s Wired to Lead podcast. The discussion focused on developing Brigadoon to be a leading global network where curious and compelling entrepreneurs and thought leaders gather as well as cognitive preferences and executing on ideas.

You can watch and hear the podcast here: https://goo.gl/KPTwxT

SONG

The Tragically Hip - Ahead By A Century https://goo.gl/tJBgwL 

SPORT

Why competitive gaming is starting to look a lot like professional sports http://bit.ly/2NXqRdD

"As e-sports continue to chase mainstream popularity, traditional sports organizations have steadily joined the ranks. Now, some of the biggest professional e-sports leagues in the world are starting to look a lot like the NBA or NFL. That includes big-money owners, a structured schedule, and things like minimum salaries and other benefits for players."